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The Iron Age

800 BC- 43AC

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The Iron Age is the last of the Three Ages of British later prehistory. It begins with the arrival of the new metal, iron, around 800 BC and ends with Roman troops landing on the shores of Kent, in AD 43. The Romans gave the British writing and with writing came recorded history – which is why prehistory is said to cease with their arrival. People in Iron Age Britain are sometimes described as Celts and they spoke Celtic languages, which survive today in Breton, Welsh, Gallic (Scotland) and Gaelic (Ireland). The working of iron requires greater control of very high temperatures which led to improvements in pottery firing and less regionalised pottery styles.  The Iron Age saw the  appearance of ditched enclosed farmstead-type settlements as at Itter Crescent, open settlements characterised by roundhouses and pits as at Fengate, and the building of the hillforts like the earthworks at Newborough. Societies were hierarchically organised in this period, having moved from the extended clan to the chiefdoms and the earliest named rulers. These are the tribes the Romans encountered when they came to Britain in the first century. The best known of these rulers was Queen Boudicca of the Iceni tribe/kingdom. She led a popular rebellion against Roman rule, in AD 60-1. Environmentally, the Iron Age sees increased flooding and higher groundwater levels in the fens.





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Britain Leaves Europe!

8000 BC

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Britain's split from Europe began more than 200,000 years ago during an ice age. At this time Britain was a peninsula of northwest Europe. Melting water from vast ice sheets filled a giant lake in the southern half of the North Sea. It was held back by a chalk ridge stretching from the southeast of England to the northwest of France.
A Lot of Water
Eventually this glacial lake filled up with so much water that the dam burst at the Strait of Dover, unleashing vast torrents of water in an enormous flood. The flood was so violent it ripped through the chalk ridge and gouged a deep valley from the Dover Straits to past the Isle of Wight. That valley became a new waterway, the Channel. It drained the rivers of northwest Europe into the Atlantic and severed Britain from the mainland.
Britain Becomes an Island
The final division from Europe was settled about 10,000 years ago, at the end of the last ice age, when rising temperatures again melted ice sheets, sea levels rose and the plains (Doggerland) connecting Britain to Europe were flooded in what became the North Sea, while the Channel River became the Channel. Britain became an island separate from mainland Europe.