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Gordon Arms Celebrations

1845

Information

The Earl and Countess of Aboyne, also known as the Marquis and Marchioness of Huntly, or Charles and Marie Gordon, were owners of Orton Hall in the mid nineteenth century. They were so happy with the birth of a new daughter that they celebrated with the locals in the eponymous Gordon Arms Inn. On 16th January 1845 they held a ball and supper with dancing that continued until late, no doubt for the local gentry. The day after they treated '300 or upwards cottagers and peasantry' to cake, tea, beef and plum pudding, which would have been very welcome in the dark depths of winter. The Morning Post, Monday 27th January 1845, Page 5, Column 1-2





Orton Hall Farm

50 AD

Information

Archaeological excavations in the 1970s revealed a large first century farmstead in the vicinity of Orton Hall. The site was first in use from around 50AD and continued to be used well into the Saxon period. The farm house had a yard with a wall around it, and there were large barns and a mill too. Agricultural activities were evident, as well as beer production and milling, suggesting some wealth was attached to the farmstead.





Roman Pottery Kilns in Stanground

200

Information

Local Roman enthusiasts will be familiar with the pottery kilns in Normangate Field near Castor. However, there was also a pottery industry in Stanground too. During the 1960s there were several excavations to explore Roman features under what is now Park Farm. Archaeologists discovered four pottery kilns dating from the early to mid-third century (200-250 AD). There was also a 'pottery dump', several ditches, burials and coins too. 15 coins were found in total, which could all be dated to between 260 AD and 350 AD. This suggests that the site was abandoned by around 365. It also suggests that the site had two different uses over two different time periods. Interestingly, two of the ditches discovered on the site were dated to pre-Roman activity, possibly Iron Age. This extends the use of the site over several centuries. Analysis of the clay on the site identified two distinct types. One clay was finer and would have been used for high-end pottery. The other was used for every-day ware and would have been chosen for more rigorous domestic use. Over 240 kilograms of pottery were identified during excavations, not all had been created at the site though. A mixture of grey ware, colour-coated ware, cream ware and shell-gritted ware were discovered. These were represented as beakers, dishes, flagons, jars and dishes on the whole. Pottery created on the site has been found at other local Roman sites including Orton Hall and Peterborough Cathedral.