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A Highwayman in Dogsthorpe

1821

Information

A highwayman stopped a farmer on Lincoln Road near Dogsthorpe and threatened to murder him if he didn’t pay up. Another traveller happened to be passing on horseback and together with the farmer gave the highwayman ‘a thorough thumping’. The farmer beat him with his own bludgeon and the traveller whipped the clothes off the highway man's back before letting him go, so badly beaten they hoped it would mend his ways.





Farmhouse to Beerhouse

1665

Information

The Bluebell Inn in Dogsthorpe is a grade II listed building on Welland Road. The reason for the listing is because of the dating stone which reads 'ITH  1665'. Originally built as a farmhouse, it became a public house early in the 19th century and has continued to be so for the last 200 years. The building has been extended and improved over the years and during one of the improvements a wooden panel was found with initials and the date 1594, suggesting that the building is older than the date stone, or that the panel had been salvaged from elsewhere and reused in the building. Picture credit: The Blue Bell, Dogsthorpe cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Paul Bryan - geograph.org.uk/p/4306835





Internationally Famous Bell Born

1964

Information

Andy Bell is known around the world as one half of the pop group Erasure. He was born in Peterborough on 25th April 1964 in Thorpe Hall. He lived in Dogsthorpe and attended both Dogsthorpe Infant and Junior Schools, where he was a choir boy. His name features in the registration book for Dogsthorpe Junior School, which is held in Peterborough Archives. He moved to Kings School for his secondary education. In 1985 Bell met his Erasure partner Vince Clark and they had huge success as a pop duo. Together they sold millions of records around the world with hits which included 'Sometimes' and 'A Little respect'. He currently calls Miami home, but is still working and touring around the world. His has given mixed feelings of his time in Peterborough, claiming that he felt 'secure and safe' whilst at Dogsthorpe Junior School, but also complaining that Peterborough was one of 'the most scary places on the planet'. He is known as a gay icon for openly embracing his sexuality and discussing topics important to the gay community.
References
https://www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/news/environment/claim-anger-over-scary-city-jibe-by-star-1-144774 www.erasureinfo.com Picture By Andrew Hurley (Flickr: Andy Bell, Erasure) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons





The Death of Thomas Deacon and the Birth of a S...

1721

Information

Thomas Deacon is best known by his eponymous school, but his story was one of charity. Born in 1651, Deacon was a wealthy man. He owned many lands including Willow Hall near Thorney and lived for a time in Boroughbury Manor. He was a wool merchant, as much of the gentry were in the city, profiting from wool or fleece produced in the area. As one of the Feoffees he offered wool to the poor to provide an income. The poor were able to gain money for spinning the wool, which helped them out of poverty. Upon his death in 1721 he left a gift of money known as a legacy, which would pay for an education for 20 poor boys. At that time only the rich could afford an education, so this was a generous gift.
Deacon's Legacy
Thomas Deacon's school was originally sited on Cowgate, where a blue plaque has been placed. The school remained there until 1883 when it moved to Deacon Street and later to Queen's Gardens off Park Road. Thankfully it now educates both boys and girls. The Thomas Deacon Foundation continue to offer educational opportunities in the form of scholarships at Thomas Deacon Academy. A large effigy of Thomas Deacon resides in Peterborough Cathedral amongst the good and great of the city.





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